Five hours at the butcher earns me an Entrecôte

The latest animal at the butcher is a 30 month old heifer. This one finished a little more marbled than the last one, which I’d bet is more due to genetic differences than anything else.

Splitting the entrecôte off from the faux-filet.

P1050953

One whole filet. This makes a very tender, but very expensive, roast. 

P1050951

Below is what the filet looks like when turned into steaks. Remember, this is a pastured animal that ate only grass and our hay. It takes time and the right genetics to get marbling.

P1050958

A cool industrial saw hanging on a retractable cable.

P1050964

It cuts ribs in seconds. The French cut their ribs into short sections to make pot-au-feu.

P1050963

The foreground is a mountain of pot-au-feu ribs and the background is a mountain of fancy steaks.

P1050968

This leg of beef would not fit into the oven.

P1050967

Oxtail! One of my favorites. It makes a fine stew.

P1050966

The salle de découpe with customer boxes stacked high.

P1050973

That 288.9kg for the carcass or about 637lb. The abattoir was at the town of Condom and the cow was a Salers.

P1050993

New for this round were some rump roasts. Each box had a roast.

P1050998

The packed boxes look like this:

Inside looks like this:

This butcher doesn’t do vacuum packing, although at some time in the future we’re going to try a packing company a little further away that does.

Here’s what an entrecôte looks like while warming up waiting to be cooked.

The best way to end a big day at the butcher’s is with a nice steak. The Agricultrix would consider wine essential.

We had customers drive from four départements to pick up their beef. Bon appétit!

About these ads

7 responses to “Five hours at the butcher earns me an Entrecôte

  1. Hello Shredster. I’d say organ meats are more popular than in America. Liver can be very expensive.

  2. Congratulations from me too! I’m still a bit surprised that people over there know what to do with a box of meat cuts like that especially with the bones. The rump roast’s the only immediately recognizable cut of them all, of what people usually eat that is. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the fat left on a filet in a shop. I’m not saying it makes sense at all.

  3. Very fine, and very good to see such quality of meat from your grass feeding regime, too.

  4. Pingback: A quick inspection of the butcher’s room | grasspunk·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s